CORONAVIRUS SEMINAR SERIES

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CORONAVIRUS SEMINAR SERIES

 


THE JOHN R. LAMONTAGNE LECTURE SERIES

2022 LaMontagne Lecture - March 22, 2022

Jason McLellanThe 2022 keynote speaker will be Jason McLellan, Ph.D., Welch Chair in Chemistry and Professor of Molecular Biosciences, The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. McLellan has worked to understand how viral protein structures operate. Viral protein structure and function are important for the development of vaccines and potential treatments for deadly viruses that have impacted the lives of billions of people. Dr. McLellan and his collaborators have engineered a key protein of coronaviruses for use in vaccines. His team has developed technology found in many leading vaccines against COVID-19 (Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, and Novavax). This discovery led to his selection as Texas Inventor of the Year by the State Bar of Texas’s Intellectual Property Section, which annually recognizes individuals and their inventions that have “significantly impacted the Texas economy.” McLellan and his colleagues also designed key proteins that form the basis of several vaccines.  These vaccines are directed against coronaviruses as well as respiratory syncytial virus, a virus especially dangerous for young children and seniors. He is the winner of multiple scientific awards, and his research and expertise have been featured in multiple media outlets.

 

2021 LaMontagne Lecture - March 23, 2021

Mary K. Estes

Our 2021 keynote speaker was Dr. Mary Estes, Distinguished Professor of Virology and Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Her research group studies viruses that infect distinct types of cells (enterocytes, crypt cells, M cells) in the GI tract as probes to learn about the biology, host response and gene expression of these cells, using multidisciplinary approaches to probe the structure and molecular biology of GI viruses to understand the basic mechanisms that control virus replication, morphogenesis, virus-host interactions, and pathogenesis.
 

 

 

COVID-19 | LCID Researchers in the News

No-vial vaccine

Vaccines Without Vials, Fridges, or Needles

June 19, 2020

LCID Researcher Dr. Maria Croyle and her team have developed a vaccine preparation technique that both imparts temperature stability and allows easy administration.

To overcome the issue of temperature sensitivity, some vaccines are freeze-dried, a process known as lyophilization, and transported as powders. But, says Maria Croyle, a pharmacologist at the University of Texas at Austin, in some instances the stability of lyophilized vaccines is less than ideal. For instance, some can be

Read more about Vaccines Without Vials, Fridges, or Needles
COVID 19 | LCID Researchers in the News

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  • CIDatUT
    CIDatUT Dr. Jaquelin Dudley, LCID Associate Director, was recently interviewed for an article in the Daily Beast on a potential nasal swab test that could be developed to determine if COVID patients will need to be hospitalized. For more, go to t.co/VjoV9lLS58 t.co/jbxCGPQaB9
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    CIDatUT Grace Kago, a grad student in LCID Director Dr. Shelley Payne's group, has worked to create a video in Gikuyu, which is spoken in Kenya. It provides basic information about the COVID pandemic and the virus. t.co/2wG25xYxxx

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